85 Moat Lane Yardley

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, March 1, 2014
85 Moat Lane Yardley, Birmingham

During the Second World War many British towns and cities suffered extensive damage from aerial bombing by the German Luftwaffe. Industrial assets - including factories, railway stations and ports - were targeted by German forces in an attempt to disrupt Britain's production of armaments, munitions, aircraft, vehicles and ships, along with the movement of troops. Aerial warfare was indiscriminate, if bombs were aimed at a particular industrial complex they could fall miles off target, through poor navigation and bomb-aiming or weather conditions. Area bombing saw significant numbers of aircraft formed overhead to saturate air defences and areas 'blitzed', damaging... Read more »


The De La Warr Pavilion

Posted by Richard Coltman on Wednesday, January 1, 2014
The De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill-on-Sea

The Victorian era saw a rapid growth of seaside resorts around the coast of Britain, fuelled by a number of factors. In Britain, working conditions for workers were improving, driven by worker's unions and increased acceptance of workers rights. The 1871 Bank Holidays Act granted workers four days when banks and offices were closed, the first guaranteed holidays for workers across Britain; while in 1909 Trade Boards Act created four trade boards that could determine minimum wages in certain industries, giving more workers higher wages. The expansion of the railways pushed out from the major cities to reach smaller seaside... Read more »


Odeon Cinema Harrogate

Posted by Richard Coltman on Tuesday, November 12, 2013
Odeon Cinema Harrogate, North Yorkshire

Standing on the corner of East Parade and Station Avenue in the North Yorkshire town of Harrogate is arguably one of Britain's finest Modernist cinema buildings. Today, the building survives as part of the Odeon cinema chain after eight decades of continuous use as a working cinema. The Odeon company traces its history back to 1930 when the firm established by Oscar Deutsch (1893-1941) opened its first cinema bearing the Odeon name, at Perry Barr in Birmingham, on 4 August 1930. The company saw its greatest period of expansion during the 1930s, as the increasing popularity of cinema-going allowed Deutsch to... Read more »


Regal Cinema Melton Mowbray

Posted by Richard Coltman on Tuesday, October 1, 2013
Regal Cinema Melton Mowbray

Standing on the corner of King Street and St Mary's Way in the Leicestershire town of Melton Mowbray is the Regal Cinema. The building is an outstanding example of a smaller regional cinema, all the more remarkable for having been built by a local company and operated as an independent cinema, and not part of a much larger chain like Gaumont, Granada Theatres or Odeon. The cinema opened in 1934 and was built by a local company, Denman & Sons. The design of the Regal Cinema incorporates a two-storey block facing onto King Street, projecting from the cinema's auditorium that can... Read more »


The Capitol Cinema Radford

Posted by Richard Coltman on Sunday, August 11, 2013
The Capitol Cinema Radford, Nottingham

Standing on the corner of Churchfield Lane and Newquay Avenue in the Nottingham district of Radford is the former Capitol Cinema. Opened in 1936, the building continued as a working cinema for five decades before it closed and was converted to a bingo hall and social club. Laterly, the building was purchased and serves as the Mount Zion Millennium City Church. In the inter-war period cinema-going became increasingly popular amongst the British public. Entrepreneurs quickly set up local cinemas to cash in on this popularity. Although cinema the industry in Britain was dominated by large players the business was such... Read more »


Odeon Cinema Scarborough

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, June 1, 2013
Odeon Cinema Scarborough, North Yorkshire

Standing on the corner of Westborough, at the junction between Northway and Filey Road, stands Scarborough's former Odeon Cinema. The building stands away from the main centre of the North Yorkshire seaside town, located opposite the train station. This impressive building was constructed in the 1930s for the Odeon Cinema chain as part of its rapidly expanding nationwide network of cinemas. The company, founded by Oscar Deutsch (1893-1941), opened its first cinema bearing the Odeon name at Perry Barr in Birmingham on 4 August 1930. The increasing popularity of cinema-going amongst the British public allowed the Odeon chain to grow,... Read more »


Perivale Underground Station

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, April 6, 2013
Perivale Underground Station, London

Standing on Horsenden Lane in Greenford, Middlesex (just off the A40 Western Avenue), Perivale is an underground station on the western part of the Central Line. Until the early 1930s public transport in London was operated by a many separate private companies, together operating a fragmented service to passengers. In 1933 the London Passenger Transport Act brought together public transport in London under the control of the London Passenger Transport Board. Tube lines, buses, coaches and trams were combined, although overground lines operated by the mainline railway companies were not included. Along with a massive merger and restructure of the combined assets of... Read more »


Southgate Underground Station

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, February 16, 2013
Southgate Underground Station, London

Standing on a roundabout at the junction of the A1004 High Street in Southgate and the A111 running east-west, Southgate Underground Station serves the Piccadilly Line on the London Underground network. The earliest Underground lines in London were constructed by the 'cut and cover' method. These tunnels were usually constructed under London's streets to avoid disturbance and potential subsidence to residential and commercial properties. Cut and cover tunnels were built at a fairly shallow depth and construction typically involved the excavation of a trench and the building of tunnel in situ before it was covered over. The use of cut and cover... Read more »


66-68 Portland Place

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, December 15, 2012
66-68 Portland Place, London

Between 1957 and 1958 the Royal Institute of British Architects extended its existing headquarters at 66 Portland Place in Central London to meet the expanding accommodation requirements of the organisation. The extensions - both upwards and outwards - were designed to harmonise with the existing Modernist building, designed by British architect George Grey Wornum. His design for 66 Portland Place was implemented between 1933, when the foundation stone was laid by the 8th Baron Howard de Walden on 28 June, and 1934 when the building was officially opened on 8 November by King George V and Queen Mary. Wornum's design for... Read more »


Arnos Grove Underground Station

Posted by Richard Coltman on Monday, November 12, 2012
Arnos Grove Underground Station, London

Standing on Bowes Road (the A1110) in the London Borough of Enfield, Arnos Grove Underground Station is arguably London's most iconic underground station, and photographs of the station and have been used extensively in the media. Of all the Underground stations designed by British architect Charles Holden, Arnos Grove is perhaps the design that represents the best of his work on the London Underground network. In 1926 the City & South London Railway (C&SLR) (owned by the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL)) commissioned seven stations for the line's extension to Morden from Charles Holden. UERL was managed by Frank... Read more »


Cockfosters Station

Posted by Richard Coltman on Sunday, October 14, 2012
Cockfosters Station, London

Standing on Cockfosters Road (the A111) in Barnet, north London, Cockfosters Station is a station serving as the northern terminus of the Piccadilly Line on London Underground. Today, the underground system is operated as a unified system, however in the early 1930s public transport in London was operated by a number of separate companies, including the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL). UERL operated a number of underground lines including the Northern and Piccadilly lines. UERL was managed by Frank Pick (1878-1941). Pick's involvement with London's Underground system is evident today in the network's stations and branding. Pick commissioned British... Read more »


The Hoover Factory Building No 7

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, September 1, 2012
The Hoover Factory Building No 7, London

Building No 7 is part of the former Hoover Factory complex in Perivale, west London. It is one of three surviving structures from the site, built between 1932 and 1938. The site is alongside the A40 arterial route, which runs from the City of London to Fishguard in Wales. Building No 7 is next to the former main office building. Together they are an impressive sight for commuters and visitors entering and leaving London. The Hoover factory site was built for the American Hoover Company as part of the company's expansion plans, when it established a manufacturing base for the company's... Read more »


The Hoover Factory

Posted by Richard Coltman on Sunday, August 12, 2012
The Hoover Factory, Greater London

Standing alongside the A40, to the west of Central London, the Hoover Building is a remarkable landmark for commuters and visitors to London using this main arterial route into the city. Originally built for the American Hoover Company, the factory on Western Avenue was built as a manufacturing base for the company's British vacuum cleaner division. The factory comprised a complex of buildings and were designed by the firm of Wallis, Gilbert and Partners. The architectural firm was established in 1914 and in subsequent decades designed some of the finest Modernist industrial buildings in Britain, including the Firestone Building, a building... Read more »


Oakwood Underground Station

Posted by Richard Coltman on Monday, July 23, 2012
Oakwood Underground Station, London

Standing on Bramley Road (the A110) in Enfield, north London, Oakwood is a station serving the Piccadilly Line on London Underground. It is the penultimate station on the northern section of the line. Oakwood briefly served as the northern terminus during the construction of the Piccadilly Line, before Cockfosters station, today's terminus, was completed in 1933. The expansive underground network of modern London has its origins in Victorian Britain, and is the oldest underground system in the world. By the start of the twentieth century the network was beginning to extend out from what today is considered central London, to the... Read more »


66 Portland Place

Posted by Richard Coltman on Monday, June 11, 2012
66 Portland Place, London

Standing on the corner of Portland Place and Weymouth Street near to London's Regents Park, 66 Portland Place is an impressive Art Deco office building serving as the headquarters of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). The RIBA, founded in 1834, is the professional body for architects in the United Kingdom. The RIBA received its Royal Charter in 1837. Today the organisation has a membership of over 40,000 professionals. The RIBA offers support and training to its membership, it seeks to inform and influence government policy, and has a public programme of different activities from exhibitions to talks. Since 1859... Read more »


Sinclairs Department Store

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, May 12, 2012
Sinclair's Department Store, Belfast

Standing on the corner of Royal Parade and North Street in the centre of Belfast (less than half a mile north of Donegall Square and the City Hall) the former Sinclair's Department Store is a fine example of Modernist architecture in Ireland, in the Art Deco style. Sinclair's was once one of Belfast's most prestigious department stores. The store on Royal Avenue as seen today was built in 1926 in the classical style. By 1935, Sinclair's was extended with an Art Deco-style addition by Belfast-born architect James Scott, who had previously designed the 1926 building. At its height the store had... Read more »


97-99 Park Avenue

Posted by Richard Coltman on Friday, April 6, 2012
97-99 Park Avenue, Ruislip

Numbers 97-99 Park Avenue, and adjacent 101 Park Avenue, are three Modernist houses in Ruislip, on the fringes of suburban-west London. The houses are a stark contrast to the surrounding housing stock on Park Avenue of traditional, brick and pitch-tiled roof, mid to late-twentieth century houses. These Modernist houses appear a curious component of a traditional urban environment, until the story of the development of the three homes is understood. When plans were submitted to the local authority in 1933 by architects Connell, Ward and Lucas, there were initially rejected. Today, we might not realise just how radical and controversial these... Read more »


Bank Of Ireland Building

Posted by Richard Coltman on Sunday, March 11, 2012
Bank of Ireland Building, Belfast

Standing on the corner of Royal Parade and North Street in the centre of Belfast (less than half a mile north of Donegall Square and the City Hall) the former Bank of Ireland Building is one of the finest Modernist buildings in Ireland. The building was constructed during 1929 and 1930 to designs by Joseph Vincent Downes. Born in 1891, Downes studied architecture at University College Dublin before graduating in 1920. During his studies Downes worked an apprenticeship at the architectural practice of Lucius O'Callaghan (1877 - 1954) and James Henry Webb (1873 - 1955). After graduation Downes initially worked in... Read more »


Chiswick Park Station

Posted by Richard Coltman on Sunday, February 5, 2012
Chiswick Park Station, London

Standing at the junction of Bollo Lane and Acton Lane in Chiswick, West London, Chiswick Park Station is a station serving the District Line on London Underground. The Underground Electric Railways Company of London operated a numebr of lines, including the Northern and Piccadilly Lines, and since 1902 the company had also owned the Metropolitan District Railway, for which Chiswick Park Station was built. The Underground Electric Railways Company of London was managed by Frank Pick (1878-1941). Pick was an enlightened leader for the company, with an appreciation for good design. He commissioned designer Edward Johnston (1872-1944) to design a typography... Read more »


Grosvenor Cinema Rayners Lane

Posted by Richard Coltman on Sunday, January 1, 2012
Grosvenor Cinema Rayners Lane, Harrow

Standing on Alexandra Avenue in Harrow, Middlesex, the former Grosvenor Cinema was built in 1936 for the Grosvenor cinema company. The cinema was designed by Frank Ernest Bromige LRIBA (1902-1979). Bromige was a London-based architect practising, at the time, out of Kingly Street in Westminster. His works in London include the former Kingsland Empire in Dalston, the Dominion Acton (later the Acton Granada, now a bingo hall) and the Dominion Hounslow. The cinema was built by the local firm of T F Nash Ltd. With the extension of the Piccadilly and Metropolitan Lines of the London Underground network, there was a... Read more »


Park Royal Station

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, October 29, 2011
Park Royal Station, London

Standing on Western Avenue, which runs west out of London, Park Royal Station serves the Piccadilly Line on London Underground. In the early 1930s public transport in London was operated by a multitude of separate companies. This saw large companies such as the Underground Electric Railways Company of London, which operated a number of underground lines including the Northern and Piccadilly lines, providing services alongside numerous smaller companies. In 1933 the London Passenger Transport Act sought to consolidate public transport services within the designated 'London Passenger Transport Area' under the auspices of the London Passenger Transport Board (London Transport). Underground and... Read more »


Osterley Station

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, October 29, 2011
Osterley Station, Isleworth

Standing on the Great West Road, which runs west out of London to Bristol, Osterley Station is a station serving the Piccadilly Line on London Underground. In the early 1930s public transport in London was operated by a multitude of separate companies. This saw large companies such as the Underground Electric Railways Company of London, which operated a number of underground lines including the Northern and Piccadilly lines, providing services alongside numerous smaller companies. In 1933 the London Passenger Transport Act sought to consolidate public transport services within the designated 'London Passenger Transport Area' under the auspices of the London Passenger... Read more »


Boston Manor Station

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, October 29, 2011
Boston Manor Station, Brentford

Standing on Boston Manor Road in Brentford, close to Junction 4 of the M4 Motorway in London, Boston Manor Station is a station serving the Piccadilly Line on London Underground. In the early 1930s public transport in London was operated by a multitude of separate companies. This saw large companies such as the Underground Electric Railways Company of London, which operated a number of underground lines including the Northern and Piccadilly lines, providing services alongside numerous smaller companies. In 1933 the London Passenger Transport Act sought to consolidate public transport services within the designated 'London Passenger Transport Area' under the auspices... Read more »


Sudbury Hill Station

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, July 23, 2011
Sudbury Hill Station, Harrow

Standing on Greenford Road in Sudbury, west London, Sudbury Hill Station is a station serving the Piccadilly Line on London Underground. In the early 1930s public transport in London was operated by a multitude of separate companies. This saw large companies such as the Underground Electric Railways Company of London, which operated a number of underground lines including the Northern and Piccadilly lines, providing services alongside numerous smaller companies. The Underground Electric Railways Company of London was managed by Frank Pick (1878-1941). Pick was an enlightened leader for the company, with an appreciation for good design. He commissioned designer Edward Johnston... Read more »


Sudbury Town Station

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, July 23, 2011
Sudbury Town Station, Wembley

Standing on Station Approach, off Harrow Road and a mile west of Wembley Stadium in west London, Sudbury Town Station is a station serving the Piccadilly Line on London Underground. In the early 1930s public transport in London was operated by a multitude of separate companies. This saw large companies such as the Underground Electric Railways Company of London, which operated a number of underground lines including the Northern and Piccadilly lines, providing services alongside numerous smaller companies. The Underground Electric Railways Company of London was managed by Frank Pick (1878-1941). Pick was an enlightened leader for the company, with an... Read more »


Rayners Lane Station

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, July 23, 2011
Rayners Lane Station, Harrow

Standing on Alexandra Avenue in Harrow, Middlesex, Rayners Lane Station is a station serving both the Metropolitan and Piccadilly Lines on London Underground. In the early 1930s public transport in London was operated by a multitude of separate companies. Large companies such as the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (which operated a number of underground lines including the Central and Piccadilly lines) and the Metropolitan Railway (which operated London's first underground line), alongside numerous small bus companies operated a fragmented service to passengers. In 1933 the London Passenger Transport Act sought to consolidate public transport services within the designated 'London... Read more »


Eastcote Station

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, July 23, 2011
Eastcote Station, Ruislip

Standing on Field End Road in Ruislip, Middlesex, Eastcote Station is a station serving both the Metropolitan and Piccadilly Lines on London Underground. In the early 1930s public transport in London was operated by a multitude of separate companies. Large companies such as the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (which operated a number of underground lines including the Central and Piccadilly lines) and the Metropolitan Railway (which operated London's first underground line), alongside numerous small bus companies operated a fragmented service to passengers. In 1933 the London Passenger Transport Act sought to consolidate public transport services within the designated 'London... Read more »


Arcadia Works

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, May 14, 2011
Arcadia Works, London

Standing on Hampstead Road in North London, opposite Mornington Crescent tube station and half a mile north of Euston Road, the Arcadia Works was built between 1926 and 1928 for the Carreras Tobacco Company. The company was established in 1788 and started business in London in the mid-1850s. By 1907 the company had a large works on City Road (which runs roughly from Moorgate north-west to Angel) in North London. By 1927 the company had outgrown its City Road works. The company commissioned plans for a new London headquarters for the company. Arthur George Porri submitted plans for a classical-influenced building... Read more »


St Olaf House

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, May 14, 2011
St Olaf House, London

Standing on Tooley Street, near to HMS Belfast and on the south side of London Bridge in central London, St Olaf House was built between 1928 and 1932 for the Hay's Wharf Company. The Hay's Wharf Company was founded in 1867 ane operated warehouses and wharves on the Thames in London. St Olaf House was built on the site of the former Church of St Olave. The company commissioned the architect Harry Stuart Goodhart-Rendel to design a London headquarters for the company. Harry Stuart Goodhart-Rendel was born in Cambridge in 1887. As well as an architect Goodhart-Rendel was a soldier, composer,... Read more »


Lion House

Posted by Richard Coltman on Saturday, May 14, 2011
Lion House, Richmond, Surrey

Throughout Greater London there are many Modernist multi-use buildings. Lion House on Red Lion Street in Richmond, Surrvey is a fine example of such an building, built very much for utilitarian purposes. Lion House stands in the centre of Richmond just off the central Hill Street/George Street thoroughfare. Like so many Modernist buildings in Britain Lion House provides a contrast to the traditional buildings in historic Richmond, not only in its style but also its scale (it is considerably larger than all the buildings in the immediate surroundings). However, opposite is another Modernist building, the Odeon Richmond which still operates as... Read more »


Summit House

Posted by Richard Coltman on Tuesday, September 28, 2010
Summit House, London

Standing on Red Lion Square just off High Holborn in central London, Summit House was built in 1925 for the Austin Reed Company. The Austin Reed menswear company was founded in 1900 and by the 1920s had a flagship store on London's Regent Street. The company commissioned the architectural practice of Westwood & Emberton to design a London headquarters for the company. Joseph Emberton was born in Staffordshire in 1889 and was responsible for some of Britain's finest Modernist buildings including Simpson's of Piccadilly (in London) and the Royal Corinthian Yacht Club in Burnham-on-Crouch; he died in 1956. Percy Westwood was... Read more »


Daily Express Building

Posted by Richard Coltman on Tuesday, September 28, 2010
Daily Express Building, London

Located at 120 Fleet Street in the City of London, the former Daily Express Building is one of London's most iconic Modernist buildings. The building was constructed between 1930 and 1932 to serve as the headquarters of the Daily Express Newspaper in the capital. Architects Ellis and Clarke (the practice later became Ellis Clarke and Gallanaugh) were commissioned by the owner of the Daily Express, Lord Beaverbrook (who served in Winston Churchill's wartime cabinet as Minister of Aircraft Production and later as Minister of Supply), to extend forward the existing Daily Express buildings towards Fleet Street. Their original proposal would see... Read more »


Isokon Building

Posted by Richard Coltman on Tuesday, September 28, 2010
Isokon Building, London

In 1931 the Isokon firm was founded by Jack and Molly Pritchard and partners. The partners of the company were interested in modern living and sought to design buildings and furniture a modern style. Previously, in the mid-1920s, Jack Pritchard had met architect Wells Wintemute Coates and a synergy between the Pritchards and Coates was formed, all having an appreciation for architecture and modern design for living. The Pritchards purchased a plot of land at Lawn Road, Hampstead, London (near to Belsize Park Underground station) and commissioned Wells Coates to design and build a block of serviced flats. Coates had grown... Read more »


Trinity Court

Posted by Richard Coltman on Tuesday, September 28, 2010
Trinity Court, London

Throughout London there are many Modernist houses and apartment buildings. Trinity Court on Gray's Inn Road near to Farringdon in central London is a fine example of such an apartment building. Trinity Court stands in front of the St Andrew's Holborn Burial Ground dating from 1754 (now a public garden). It provides a contrast to the traditional buildings on Grays Inn Road, not only in its style but also its scale (it is considerably taller than all the buildings in the immediate surroundings). Trinity Court was built between 1934 and 1935 to plans drawn up by the London-based architectural practice... Read more »


Odeon Cinema Bridgwater

Posted by Richard Coltman on Thursday, August 19, 2010
Odeon Cinema Bridgwater, Somerset

The former Odeon cinema on Penel Orlieu in Bridgwater, Somerset was designed by British architect Thomas Cecil Howitt (1889 - 1968). Howitt designed a number of cinemas - at Bridgwater, Clacton, Warley,and Weston-super-Mare - for the Odeon chain. Howitt had previously worked in Nottingham city engineer's department and later in private practice in the same city. His design at Bridgwater aped that at nearby Weston-super-Mare, although the Odeon Bridgwater was a some-what simpler design than that seen at Weston-super-Mare. All four of Howitt's Odeons featured a square tower with a projecting flat slab roof supported by squat, cylindrical columns - the... Read more »


Odeon Cinema Weston-super-Mare

Posted by Richard Coltman on Thursday, August 19, 2010
Odeon Cinema Weston-super-Mare, Somerset

The Odeon cinema in Weston-super-Mare stands on the corner of Walliscote Road and Regent Street, a quarter of a mile from the sea front of the North Somerset town. The building is an imposing structure and arguably one of the finest buildings constructed for the Odeon cinema chain. The building was designed by British architect Thomas Cecil Howitt (1889 - 1968). Howitt is responsible for a number of significant twentieth century buildings in Nottingham, where he worked in the city engineer's department and later in private practice. Howitt also went on to design a number of cinemas for the Odeon chain. His... Read more »


Pinner Court And Capel Gardens

Posted by Richard Coltman on Thursday, August 19, 2010
Pinner Court and Capel Gardens, Pinner

Pinner Court and the neighbouring Capel Gardens (illustrated above) lie on Pinner Road in the Middlesex town of Pinner. They were both designed by local architect H J Mark and built by the Courtenay Property Company Limited. H J Mark worked locally, having designed much of nearby Eastcote town centre and a number of fine buildings at neighbouring Rayners Lane. The two 'blocks' of Capel Gardens and Pinner Court lie to either side - to the west and east respectively - of the driveway from Pinner Road to Pinner Cemetery. They are approached by separate, private side roads. The two blocks... Read more »


Odeon Cinema Leicester

Posted by Richard Coltman on Tuesday, June 1, 2010
Odeon Cinema Leicester, Leicestershire

The former Odeon cinema in Leicester is a striking building, designed by Harry Weedon and Robert Bullivant from Odeon's favoured architectural practice. The cinema stands on a corner site at the junction of Rutland Street and Queen Street in Leicester. The cinema housed a single screen and seating for nearly 2,200 customers. It opened on 28 July 1938 and remained part of the Odeon cinema chain for 59 years. As with many corner-site Odeon cinemas the Weedon Partnership used a entrance beneath a curved canopy and frontage. At Leicester, five double doors are accessed up by three steps from street level.... Read more »


Odeon Cinema Loughborough

Posted by Richard Coltman on Tuesday, June 1, 2010
Odeon Cinema Loughborough, Leicestershire

The former Odeon Cinema, located on Baxtergate in Loughborough, is a fine, surviving building from the Odeon Cinema chain. Modernist architecture was almost exclusively used by Deutsch. The chain, started by Oscar Deutsch with its first cinema in Perry Barr in Birmingham owned in excess of 250 cinemas prior to the Second World War. Like many of the early Odeon cinemas the Odeon Newport was designed by the Weedon Partnership, with Arthur J Price assisting Harry Weedon in the execution of the design. Overall, the design features were used on a number of cinemas designed by Weedon. The Tower West Bromwich,... Read more »


Odeon Cinema Newport

Posted by Richard Coltman on Tuesday, June 1, 2010
Odeon Cinema Newport, Gwent

The former Odeon Cinema, located on Clarence Place in Newport, Gwent, is a remarkable, surviving building from the Odeon Cinema chain. The chain, started by Oscar Deutsch with its first cinema in Perry Barr in Birmingham owned in excess of 250 cinemas prior to the Second World War. Modernist architecture was almost exclusively used by Deutsch; only local planning constraints in particularly sensitive locations - such as historic Chester and York - restricted the design ambitions of Deutsch's architects. Like many of the early Odeon cinemas the Odeon Newport was designed by the Weedon Partnership, with Arthur J Price assisting Harry... Read more »


Saltdean Lido

Posted by Richard Coltman on Sunday, September 20, 2009
Saltdean Lido, Saltdean

Three miles along the south coast, east of Brighton lies the small town of Saltdean. Despite its size Saltdean possesses two of the finest Modernist buildings in Britain, the Ocean Hotel and Saltdean Lido. A lido is essentially a public outdoor swimming pool and accompanying facilities. The construction of lidos in Britain reached its zenith in the 1930s. Over one-hundred and fifty lidos were built across the country, not only on the coast like at Saltdean, but also in many industrial cities and urban areas. Saltdean Lido was built in 1938 and was designed by the architect Richard William Herbert Jones,... Read more »


Embassy Court

Posted by Richard Coltman on Sunday, September 20, 2009
Embassy Court, Brighton

Standing on King's Road on Brighton sea front Embassy Court is a fine example of the Modernist Movement. Designed by the architect Wells Coates Embassy Court was built between 1934 and 1936. Wells Coates (1895 - 1958) was a designer and architect and was responsible for many fine Modernist buildings in Britain, including the Isokon building in London and the Telekinema for the 1951 Festival of Britain. The building is a striking contrast to the surrounding Regency and Victorian-style buildings on Brighton's sea front, although clearly not on the same scale as Marine Court in nearby St Leonard's on Sea... Read more »


BBC Broadcasting House

Posted by Richard Coltman on Sunday, March 1, 2009
BBC Broadcasting House, London

Broadcasting House, on Portland Place in London, was designed by architects George Val Myer and Watson Hart for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The interiors were designed by architect Raymond McGrath. It was Britain's first purpose-built broadcasting facility including offices and radio studios. The building comprises a steel frame construction clad in Portland stone rising for nine stories. The building extends north for some thirty-five bays along Portland Place. The main entrance, off Portland Place on Langham Place, rises for six stories and is topped with an ornamental clock and latticework mast. Above the main entrance doors, atop a stone lintel,... Read more »


Ideal House

Posted by Richard Coltman on Sunday, March 1, 2009
Ideal House, London

Ideal House in London stands on the corner of Great Marlborough Street and Argyll Street, just off Regent Street. Ideal House was designed by architects Raymond Hood and Gordon Jeeves for the American National Radiator Company. The design was inspired by the American Radiator Building on Bryant Park in Manhattan, New York designed by Raymond Hood and John Howells and built in 1924. The building was constructed of polished blocks of black granite, ornamented with enamel friezes and cornices in yellows, oranges, greens and gold. The black and gold colours were the colours of the National Radiator Company. The entrances... Read more »


Odeon Cinema Dudley

Posted by Richard Coltman on Sunday, June 1, 2008
Odeon Cinema Dudley, West Midlands

The Odeon Cinema Dudley was built on a plot opposite Dudley Castle and opened on 28 July 1937. The cinema stands on Castle Hill, which rises from Birmingham Road to Dudley Town Centre. The cinema was designed by Harry Weedon and Budge Reid of the Weedon Partnership in the Odeon house style. The general outline of the design is similar to many Odeon cinemas, including Swiss Cottage in London, Bolton in Greater Manchester, and Loughborough in Leicestershire. The symmetrical design of the cinema is in a single, brick-faced block outside a steel, inner frame. Both corners of the front elevation... Read more »


Odeon Cinema Wolverhampton

Posted by Richard Coltman on Sunday, June 1, 2008
Odeon Cinema Wolverhampton, West Midlands

The former Odeon Cinema stands on Skinner Street in the centre of Wolverhampton. The Mayor Of Wolverhampton, Sir Charles Mander, officially opened the cinema on 11 September 1937. The cinema was designed by Harry Weedon and P.J. Price. The design was distinguished by a main tower. Set on the left hand side of the building the tall, slender tower features two projecting vertical 'ribs' clad in black faience. The front of the tower itself is clad in buff faience while the sides are characterised with projecting vermilion red horizontal 'ribs'. The 'ribs' terminate just short of the full height of... Read more »


Odeon Cinema Kingstanding

Posted by Richard Coltman on Sunday, June 1, 2008
Odeon Cinema Kingstanding, Birmingham

Located at the convergence of six roads in Kingstanding in Birmingham, the Odeon cinema stands out as a dramatic building as it is the tallest building within the locality. As the cinema is surrounded on both sides by roads it dominates the environment. Designed by Harry Weedon and Cecil Clavering and built between 1935 and 1936, the cinema is one of the best surviving Odeon cinemas in Britain and represents one of the finest works of the Weedon Partnership. This area is particularly fortunate to have two of the most significant surviving Odeon Cinemas in the country; within a few... Read more »


Odeon Cinema Sutton Coldfield

Posted by Richard Coltman on Sunday, June 1, 2008
Odeon Cinema Sutton Coldfield, West Midlands

One company more than any other in Britain brought Modernist architecture to the attention of towns and cities across the country. The Odeon cinema chain owned in excess of 250 cinemas prior to the Second World War. Oscar Deutsch had commissioned the firm of Weedon Partnership to design a cinema in Perry Barr, Birmingham. The style of that cinema was so well received by Deutsch that this became the in-house style for the three hundred cinemas designed by the Weedon Partnership. The cinema in Sutton Coldfield, near Birmingham in the West Midlands was built in 1935 - 1936 to plans by... Read more »


Marine Court

Posted by Richard Coltman on Sunday, June 1, 2008
Marine Court, St Leonards-on-Sea

Marine Court in St Leonards-on-Sea in East Sussex was constructed by South Coast (Hastings & St Leonards) Properties company. On 30 November 1936 the foundation stone was laid by Robert Holland-Martin, Chairman of the Southern Railway and the building was completed in 1938. Marine Court is fourteen storeys high, and from basement to roof, measures 170 ft/49 metres in height; east-west 416 ft/127 metres in length. When viewed from the east or west Marine Court is very tall and slender, from the beach (south) or north, the full expanse of the building dwarfs all those on the seafront. Marine Court... Read more »


All posts

Browse list of all posts

View by date

View building profiles by date

Subscribe

View building profiles RSS feed

Share

Share this page with your friends

About

A collection of over forty profiles of some of the finest historic Modernist buildings of Britain. The illustrated profiles are of Britain's finest Art Deco, International Style and Streamlined Moderne buildings.

Follow

For updates and our other heritage, aviation and maritime-themed websites please visit our main website and follow us on Twitter.